We personalize your experience.

We use cookies in our website to ensure we give you the best experience, get to know our users and deliver better marketing. For this purpose, we may share the information collected with third parties. By clicking “Allow cookies” you give us your consent to use all cookies. If you prefer to manage your cookies click on the “Manage cookies” link below.

Manage Cookies

Student Resume Examples - How-to Guide and Tips

Whether you’re in high school or grad school, ResumeHelp’s student resume examples and tips will help you highlight your best qualifications in your resume.

Donna Wright Profile
By Donna Wright 3 minute read

Our customers have been hired by:*Foot Note

Student Resume

A student resume might seem like other resumes but its approach and content are slightly different. This type of resume is unique because you’ll likely have to focus more on education, volunteer work, relevant coursework and other extracurricular activities to prove to hiring managers you have the skills and qualifications necessary to land the job.

Even without experience, you can still promote your best qualities on a resume and impress hiring managers. It’s all about knowing how to structure the resume, analyzing the job description to see what the company is looking for, and making sure you’re getting your skills and talents across.

To help you write a professional student resume, our article will provide you with:

  • Student resume samples that can be used to create a strong resume
  • Resume tips for writing each section of your student resume and formatting it correctly
  • Additional resources you need to write a cover letter for your resume, as well as links to other major resume tips
Build my resume

How to format your student resume

There are three standard resume formats to choose from:

  • Functional resume: Also known as the skills-based resume, this format is ideal for students with little to no professional experience. Why? Unlike the other formats, the functional format focuses on skills and training. It features multiple skills sections, such as “Summary of Qualifications” and “Professional Skills,” so you can properly highlight everything you know how to do. The work history section is more brief. If you’re creating a student resume with no experience, we highly recommend choosing this format.
  • Combination resume: You might be a student who has worked one or two part-time jobs through high school or college. In that case, consider using the combination resume format. It features a skills section and a work history section with bullet points so that you can describe to prospective employers your work achievements and major responsibilities. This format is ideal for people with a few years of work experience.
  • Chronological resume: While the chronological format is the most commonly used of the three formats, it’s not the best option for all job seekers. The reverse-chronological resume is better suited for people with more than nine years of experience, as it heavily focuses on professional experience and career growth. Unless you have a lot of professional experience, writing your student resume in this format might lead to a less than convincing overview of your qualifications, so we don’t necessarily recommend it.

In addition to choosing the best resume format, it’s also important to follow the formatting tips below:

  • Use a professional font. Avoid leaving a bad first impression using fonts like Comic Sans or Papyrus and stick to professional fonts like Helvetica, Arial and Times New Roman.
  • Have the same margins. Your student resume should have 1-inch margins all around unless you need additional space for your skills and training. If that’s the case, you can take them down half an inch.
  • Choose a readable font size. A good resume might not get you anywhere if the recruiter can’t read it. Make sure the body text of your student resume is at 11 or 12 points, the subheadings 14 or 15 and the header with your name at 16 or 18.
  • Select the correct spacing. The space between the lines should be single or 1.5.
  • Save and send in the right format. Typically, employers will want to receive resume job applications as a PDF or MS Word document. Read the job description well just in case they want a specific file format.
  • Save time with a professional template. The best way to ensure your student resume looks its best is to use one of our resume templates. They’re preformatted, so you don’t have to worry about margins or font sizing and are designed to pass applicant tracking systems (ATS).

How to write a student resume

Follow the resume writing tips below to make a strong student resume. We also have a How to Write a Resume article with extra information and advice.

1. Header and contact information

Write your name and contact information in the header. You should also include your phone number and a professional email address where you can be contacted. If you have a social media account such as a LinkedIn profile or a portfolio of your work, you can link it in this section.

2. Resume summary/resume objective

Next, it’s time to summarize your top skills and qualifications. You can do this by writing a resume summary or writing a resume objective. They’re both a two- to three-sentence introduction to your top skills and relevant experience but a resume objective also emphasizes your career goals, making it ideal for students with no professional experience.

A resume summary is recommended for job seekers with more than three years of experience. How to write a summary for a resume? You should highlight the skills and experience most relevant to the job. For example:

Hardworking high school student with three years of experience in customer service. Excellent communication skills, interpersonal skills and organizational skills. Proven ability to work in fast-paced environments, find creative solutions to problems and collaborate well with others to ensure customer satisfaction.

If you don’t have professional work experience, a resume objective — also known as a career objective — is a great way to talk about your key skills and tell prospective employers that you’re seeking employment. In fact, most students will have a resume objective rather than a resume summary because resume objectives emphasize your career goals, while resume summaries will quickly summarize where you’ve already been.

To get the immediate attention of the reader, create a powerful resume objective by summarizing relevant skills, any relevant experience, including internships or extracurricular activities and your academic highlights. Here’s a good object for a resume. It’s an example tailored for a student:

Diligent 4.0 GPA high school student seeking opportunity to apply leadership skills and basic data entry skills in entry-level jobs. High proficiency in written and verbal communication, able to work with large groups and learn processes quickly. Proven success juggling multiple projects at the same time and enhancing the quality of deliverables.

3. Skills section

Resume skills can come from anywhere, including your experience at school. Make sure you include a mixture of 8-10 soft skills, intangible traits that can be applied to any job and hard skills or technical skills which are abilities learned through training that are specific to a job, use bullet points to list them. For example:

Hard skills

  • Microsoft Office programs (e.g., Excel, Word, etc.)
  • Adobe Creative Suite (e.g., Photoshop or Illustrator)
  • Google Drive (e.g., Google Docs, Google Slides, etc.)
  • HTML/Javascript/CSS
  • Cashier skills

Soft skills

If you’re creating your student resume following the functional format’s guidelines, you’ll likely have to create additional resume skills sections, such as:

  • “Professional Skills” or “Relevant Skills” section: Select your top three core skills and explain how you’ve used them in three to five bullet points, similar to the traditional work history section.
  • “Summary of Qualifications” section: This section typically goes below your career objective. Use three bullet points to summarize the skills that make you a great candidate for the job. For example: “Able to prioritize tasks and solve issues in fast-paced environments.”

4. Work experience section

The work history section in your student resume will depend on the format you have chosen. If you’re writing a resume using the functional format, this section will not include bullet points. However, if you’ve chosen the combination — or even chronological — resume format, use the tips below.

A big misconception is that relevant experience can only come from a professional setting. The truth is that you can obtain important work experience and skills from volunteer work, a summer part-time job, extracurricular activities and any internships.

To capture your relevant experience, be sure to:

  • Write in reverse-chronological order, so your current or latest job title is at the top.
  • Include three to five bullet points per job highlighting major responsibilities and achievements.
  • Start each bullet point with an action verb like assisted, wrote, organized or planned.
  • Use numbers and quantifiable metrics when possible.

For example:

Tutor / Oct. 2021 – April 2022
Riverside High School, Riverside, CA

  • Helped high school students grades 10-12 understand Chemistry and Biology subjects.
  • Prepped an average of 10 students for upcoming tests and semester projects.
  • Coordinated group tutoring sessions of up to five students, creating a collaborative environment that motivated students.

5. Education

There are different ways to write your education section.

  • If you haven’t graduated high school, include your expected date of graduation on resume, in parentheses.
  • Below the type of degree or diploma you’re obtaining, include in bullet points any special recognitions or awards, such as the Dean’s List.
  • You may also include relevant coursework to give the hiring manager an idea of the work you’ve done.
  • If you’re currently a college student, the same instructions apply to you. If you’re a college graduate with a bachelor’s degree, you don’t have to include your high school diploma.

For example:

High School Diploma | Expected in June 2024

Riverside High School | Riverside, CA

  • AP Biology
  • AP Chemistry
  • Science National Honor Society

6. Additional sections

If you have relevant certifications, additional awards or training, you can create more sections in your student resume to list them. You can also do this to highlight volunteer experience or extracurricular clubs you belong to.

More examples and tips

ResumeHelp has tons more resources with resume and cover letter tips, job interview advice and everything you need to take the next step in your career.

Build my resume

Write a student cover letter to accompany your resume

A professional cover letter will take your job application to the next level. Use our resources to create a strong cover letter for your student resume.

  • How to Write a Cover Letter: Our expert guide will take you through the cover letter writing process with examples and pro tips.
  • Cover Letter Builder: Our Cover Letter Builder gives you step-by-step instructions and helps you create a cover letter fast.
  • Cover Letter Templates: Choose one of our beautiful cover letter templates to complement your student resume.
  • Cover Letter Format: Follow our formatting guidelines to ensure your cover letter looks its best.
  • Cover Letter Examples: Our cover letter samples library has hundreds of examples for different jobs and industries.

The big takeaways

Now that we’ve gone over our resume writing tips and resume examples for students, let’s do a quick recap of all the important points:

  1. Choose one of the three resume formats based on your years of experience.
  2. The header should include a phone number and a professional email address.
  3. For a student resume, a career objective is a better option than a resume summary.
  4. Include a mix of relevant skills, both soft and hard.
  5. The work experience section will look different depending on the resume format you chose.
  6. Relevant experience doesn’t just come from a professional setting.
  7. Your work history should focus on major responsibilities and accomplishments.
  8. The education section can feature relevant coursework and awards.
  9. You should create additional resume sections to highlight other important information.
  10. Proofread to ensure your student resume and cover letter are typo-free.

Trusted by professionals

FAQ: Student resume

Have questions? We’re here to help.

Many students don’t have a lot of professional work experience under their belts, so to stand out, feature volunteer work or internship experience that can grab the recruiter’s interest. If you have neither of these, focus on your skills section. You may even consider including extracurricular activities if they’re relevant.

This depends on a few factors. It’s not typically a good idea to include your GPA on your student resume, even for entry-level jobs. Hiring managers are usually more interested in the fact that you graduated than the fact that you got a 3.8 GPA. However, if your GPA was good enough to grant you special academic honors or achievements, like being part of the Dean’s List or graduating summa cum laude, you can add those special highlights to your education section.

Yes! Soft skills are a great addition to your student resume. It’s best to connect these soft skills to a relevant experience from school so the hiring manager understands how you demonstrated these skills in action. Instead of just listing “critical thinking skills” on your student resume, for example, include bullet points below your extracurricular activities showcasing that you used critical thinking skills during your student council meetings.

The first thing you should do before writing your student resume is to read the job ad to see what the employer is looking for. What are the requirements to get hired? What skills are necessary to do the job? Do you have most of the skills listed?

Next, tailor your student resume to the job. Include key skills mentioned in the job description, as well as similar responsibilities that are relevant. If you don’t have professional experience, you can mention volunteer work, after-school extracurricular activities, internships or even personal projects that helped you gain important skills and experiences.

The most important thing to remember is that, whether your experience comes from a professional job or an after-school program, it must be relevant to the job you want.

A student resume should include:

  1. Header with contact information
  2. Career objective with key skills
  3. Soft skills, hard skills and technical skills
  4. Relevant experience (Can be obtained from volunteer work or extracurricular activity)
  5. Education section

In this instance it’s better to just omit the school from your resume and start over. It’s important to remember that your schooling is only a small portion of your life and learning. Regardless of the grades you earned, when assembling your resume you should focus on your competencies and skills that align with the company you want to work for. Take the time to think about your best skills and list them out. This can help you approach employers with confidence and enthusiasm. Our Resume Builder can also help you by providing text suggestions that help employers see the person behind the paper. If you want to explain your experiences and career highlights in more detail, having an accompanying cover letter is a good idea.

Couldn't find the answer you're looking for?

You can always contact us.

Donna Wright Profile
WRITTEN BY Donna Wright

Donna is a career expert with extensive experience in the fields of Marketing, Publishing, Direct Mail and Communications. She’s witnessed firsthand the importance of a powerful resume and cover letter to a job search, so she takes great pride in helping change the lives of job seekers by sharing expert career advice and tips to help land the perfect job.

right resume

Pair your resume with a matching cover letter